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LBP-HIT study

Laatste wijziging: 24 januari 2022

Structural and functional effects of High Intensity Training program in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain

 

Principal Investigator: Prof. Dr. Frank Vandenabeele, Researcher: Dr. Anouk Agten

 

Low back pain has in the Western world a prevalence of 84% and 11-12% of the working population will be unift to work. An episode of low back pain is chronic when it persists longer than 12 weeks. Non-specific chronic low back pain (ASCLRP) is low back pain without a known cause or pathology. ASCLRP has an important socio-economic impact on society. The current treatment of low back pain is multidisciplinary performed with, among others, education and exercise. Exercise therapy includes both stabilizing training (based on studies showing a relationship between different core stability, stabilizing muscles and chronic evolution of low back pain) and restoring the physical condition (based on studies that associate low levels of physical activity with a poor outcome low back pain episode). While this exercise is widely used, the results are only moderately. In other patient populations, the positive effect of high intensity training (HIT) has proved to be better compared to the regular exercise. However, the optimal intensity for training programs in low back pain rehabilitation is not yet known. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of HIT for the treatment of ASCLRP.


This study is a randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) with four research groups (four treatment groups) in which the effects of High Intensity Training (HIT) in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (ASCLRP) is investigated. They will be compared to a 5th non-randomized group (control group). In addition, a healthy control group will be added. These persons do not have chronic and/or acute low back pain. Special attention will be given to match persons from the control group with persons from the three research groups.